Hiatus

Hiatus bridges the gap between formal scripts used for invitations and more classic settings and casual scripts that exude a warmer tone. Like many formal scripts, Hiatus is fully connecting. Its low body height combined with generous letterspacing adds an elegant profile to lines of text. Like casual scripts, Hiatus has a warm, hand-lettered appearance with great rhythm. Solid in structure; Hiatus also sets well at smaller sizes.
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Bramble

The characters in Bramble are nothing short of lively and organic. The normal version has a more simple and legible demeanor and the wild works well for a more lively playful look. Bramble can be used equally well in both light humorous settings and naturalistic contexts. Try Normal and Wild fonts intermingled to create settings with more variety.
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Chai Tea

P22 Chai Tea is unique among brush lettering scripts. Its sweeping strokes and luxurious use of horizontal space lend personality and warmth to any project. Its sturdy letterforms make it ideal for logos, stationery, titling and packaging.
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De Soto

Warm and inviting— DeSoto is a titling face sure to ad a touch of grace to many projects. Its name and inspiration come from a few letters in a 1958 DeSoto magazine advertisement. Many automobile ads back then used wide faces to create a feeling of luxury and elegance. DeSoto gives you that same feeling, but in a more contemporary fashion. Comes in 4 styles all fully loaded with OpenType features. Buy On Veer

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Memoir

Taking inspiration from 18th century handwritten letters, journals and documents, Memoir is a romantic yet robust design. Its textured profile speaks of surface and age, but this face will look very much at home in contemporary design. Useful for menus, cards, packaging, and logos, its versatility will prove its worth. Unlike signature fonts from that era, Memoir is designed to set in a manner that connects fluidly as if it were actually written.
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Memoir was selected as one of the 2008 favorites at Typographica. Read on Typographica

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Montague

Montague Script takes its name from a small hilltown of western Massachusetts rich in culture and history. I lived in this beloved community for a number of years and it’s where I first began my study of calligraphy and lettering. While most brush scripts take their cue from mid-twentieth century samples, Montague Script is a fresh, contemporary alternative. It comes directly from lettering written with a #3 sable brush on smooth vellum and is digitized with the same sensibility a lettering artist writes with. Montague reflects a dynamic interplay between form and rhythm not usually associated with type. Words suggest a baseline, yet are not bound by it. Letters vary in size, connect smoothly, yet break that connection purposefully as the scribe does intuitively. Beginnings, endings, alternates and ligatures come in as needed while you type. Many more alternates are available in the glyph palette of most current graphic software. Exuberant swash versions of upper and lowercase letters, as well as ligatures can be accessed through both the type and glyph palettes.
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Raniscript

Raniscript started out as an idea for a bold and strongly structured ronde style script with some contemporary touches.. As I tinkered with various forms it took on a life of its own. The name comes from a series of colorful vintage matchbook designs advertising the Flying Rani. You'll find Raniscript ideal for packaging, book titles, brochures or anything requiring a robust display treatment.
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Shoebop

Displaying vibrant rhythm, Shoebop is a versatile brush-lettering font with a delightful retro flair. The letters bounce playfully, while individual strokes contain a subtle thickening towards the base that adds a sense of stability. Shoebop contains loads of contextual substitutes and ligatures that help it set beautifully. Buy on Veer

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Tai Chi

Experimental lettering created in 1999 became the spark that transformed into the Tai Chi design. Tai Chi is a display face but it could also be used as a textured calligraphic script. Its delightful sense of movement distinguishes it from other scripts. Individual characters stand poised in a vertical Zen-like balance while at the same time displaying an inner rhythm that makes them appear to dance along the line. Rich in texture and variation, Tai Chi works very well at medium and large point sizes. The font contains several alternate letters that help maintain a hand-lettered look.
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